[Editor: This may seem a little off-topic for a forex software company but Boston Technologies is always looking for ways to be smart and efficient. At a recent company meeting, we discussed ways to be green and the idea of switching from paper cups to ceramic mugs came up...]

Going Green...

That is the buzz word in the agenda of every successful company - or at least it should be. There are many ways we can define what it really means to "Go green". The simplified ideas is to be aware of how our individual life style effect our environment, and how to take proper measure to minimize our foot print individually and as a community.  

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Going Green...

Boston, MA May 17, 2011

[Editor: This may seem a little off-topic for a forex software company but Boston Technologies is always looking for ways to be smart and efficient. At a recent company meeting, we discussed ways to be green and the idea of switching from paper cups to ceramic mugs came up...]

Going Green...

That is the buzz word in the agenda of every successful company - or at least it should be. There are many ways we can define what it really means to "Go green". The simplified ideas is to be aware of how our individual life style effect our environment, and how to take proper measure to minimize our foot print individually and as a community.

Saving energy is one aspect of it. Reducing material usage is another.


Question of the day: Using paper cup vs. ceramic mugs: which one is greener?

The short answer is: "It depends on the region." In areas where there is water shortage (the southwest US for example), using a paper cup is greener. You can always re-use the paper cup as a way to reduce material consumption.

In the New England area, using a ceramic mug is greener since it can be washed regularly without having a major impact on water consumption. In this region, the environmental cost is a lot higher to transport disposed of material to an incinerator facility and disposing the ash in a landfill afterward. The sulfur emission released during incineration process, along with what ends up less than 6 feet under, has a much larger environmental foot print.

Posted May 17, 2011 by Ramin Pourali